Reimagining Public Safety: Sharing Police Duties With Specially Trained Crisis Workers

Around 80% of 911 calls in the U.S. are made for nonviolent, non-property offenses, according to research from the Vera Institute.

Reimagining Public Safety: Sharing Police Duties With Specially Trained Crisis Workers
A Chicago Police vehicle waits for a traffic signal in front of Wrigley Field as the marquee displays End Racism on Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in Chicago. AP Photo
Reimagining Public Safety: Sharing Police Duties With Specially Trained Crisis Workers
A Chicago Police vehicle waits for a traffic signal in front of Wrigley Field as the marquee displays End Racism on Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in Chicago. AP Photo

Reimagining Public Safety: Sharing Police Duties With Specially Trained Crisis Workers

Around 80% of 911 calls in the U.S. are made for nonviolent, non-property offenses, according to research from the Vera Institute.

Amid nationwide calls for racial justice and alternatives to policing, more cities are looking to shift non-emergency calls to crisis intervention teams.

Reset takes a look at one community-based public safety system that’s seen success in Eugene, Ore., and how other cities are exploring the model.

GUESTS: Benjamin Brubaker, clinic co-coordinator at White Bird Clinic

Anne Janks, organizer at Coalition for Police Accountability

Ald. Rossana Rodriguez-Sanchez, 33rd Ward