Report Concludes That U.S. Military Under-counts Civilian Killings In Iraq and Syria

Iraq
In this Monday, Jan. 4, 2016 photo, smoke rises from Islamic State positions following a U.S.-led coalition airstrike in Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Iraq. Islamic State had captured Ramadi in May, in one of its biggest advances since the U.S.-led coalition began striking the group in 2014. Recapturing the city, which is the provincial capital of Anbar, provided a major morale boost for Iraqi forces. AP Photo / AP Photo
Iraq
In this Monday, Jan. 4, 2016 photo, smoke rises from Islamic State positions following a U.S.-led coalition airstrike in Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Iraq. Islamic State had captured Ramadi in May, in one of its biggest advances since the U.S.-led coalition began striking the group in 2014. Recapturing the city, which is the provincial capital of Anbar, provided a major morale boost for Iraqi forces. AP Photo / AP Photo

Report Concludes That U.S. Military Under-counts Civilian Killings In Iraq and Syria

According to a recent investigative report in GlobalPost, since the U.S.- led coalition began bombing campaigns over 18 months ago in Iraq and Syria, the United States has admitted to killing just 21 innocent civilians, but GlobalPost maintains that the number could be more than one thousand.

We talk with Richard Hall, Middle East and Africa editor and senior correspondent in Beirut for GlobalPost. In his co-written investigative report Hall writes that, in some cases, GlobalPost provided the U.S. military with better intel than its own investigators had turned up.