Russia Is Trying To Disrupt America’s Election, Again

American voters are being targeted via posts on social media to sway the outcome of the U.S. Presidential Election

Russia Facebook
In this April 14, 2020 file photo, the thumbs up Like logo is shown on a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook said Tuesday, Sept. 1 that it removed a small network of accounts and pages linked to Russia's Internet Research Agency, the “troll factory" that has used social media accounts to sow political discord in the U.S. since the 2016 presidential election. Jeff Chiu / AP Photo
Russia Facebook
In this April 14, 2020 file photo, the thumbs up Like logo is shown on a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook said Tuesday, Sept. 1 that it removed a small network of accounts and pages linked to Russia's Internet Research Agency, the “troll factory" that has used social media accounts to sow political discord in the U.S. since the 2016 presidential election. Jeff Chiu / AP Photo

Russia Is Trying To Disrupt America’s Election, Again

American voters are being targeted via posts on social media to sway the outcome of the U.S. Presidential Election

During the 2016 Presidential Election a Russian group infiltrated American’s social media platforms in an attempt to sway the outcome. Four years later, the same group—the Internet Research Agency—is pushing again to influence Americans with disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter.

The group has upped its tactics by hiring Americans and creating more convincing fake news platforms. New York Times cybersecurity reporter Sheera Frenkel joins Reset for the latest on the story.

GUEST: Sheera Frenkel, New York Times reporter on cybersecurity