Russia’s Return To Global Power

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, holds a sword
Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, holds a sword while listening to the head of Russian First Channel Konstantin Ernst, during his meeting with the crew of the historical action film "Viking", in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016. The "Viking" movie is an historical action film based on the historical document Primary Chronicle and the Icelandic Kings' sagas. Mikhail Klimentyev / Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP
Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, holds a sword
Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, holds a sword while listening to the head of Russian First Channel Konstantin Ernst, during his meeting with the crew of the historical action film "Viking", in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Dec. 30, 2016. The "Viking" movie is an historical action film based on the historical document Primary Chronicle and the Icelandic Kings' sagas. Mikhail Klimentyev / Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

Russia’s Return To Global Power

Coverage of Vladimir Putin and Russia has reached a peak since the election. Reacting to alleged election tampering and heightened geopolitical tensions in Syria and Ukraine, the Obama administration has tightened sanctions and ejected 35 top Russian diplomats from the U.S.

According to Joshua Keating, a staff writer at Slate, these are signs that Russia is being taken seriously as a major geopolitical player for the first time in two decades—something he argues nobody expected.

Keating joins Worldview to discuss Russia’s role in the world. His article, Russia Resurgent, appears on the cover of this month’s issue of Slate.