Sen. Cory Booker On Push To Make Lynching A Federal Crime

CONGRESS LYNCHING
From left, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, hold a news conference to discuss the "Emmett Till Antilynching Act" J. Scott Applewhite / ASSOCIATED PRESS
CONGRESS LYNCHING
From left, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, hold a news conference to discuss the "Emmett Till Antilynching Act" J. Scott Applewhite / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Cory Booker On Push To Make Lynching A Federal Crime

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives will vote on the Emmett Till Antilynching Act introduced by Illinois Representative Bobby Rush. If passed, the bill would make lynching a federal crime — a legislative task that’s been before Congress for over a hundred years.

Reset digs into the significance of the proposed bill, and what it’s taken to get to this point.

GUESTS: Cory Booker, U.S. Senator from New Jersey

Amy Kate Bailey, sociology professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago and co-author of Lynched: The Victims of Southern Mob Violence