Solutions To Violence In Chicago: Restorative Justice

School Punishments
Using a restorative justice model, which includes teachers and students gathering in circles for discussions, seventh graders Sarah Reusser, second from left, and Jayden Witter, top right, talk with Jackie Wade, bottom left, assistant principal Rufus Lott, third from left, assistant principal Sara Tompkins, Phillip Carney, bottom right, and counselor Betty Arredondo, bottom center, about a recent conflict, at Ed White Middle School, Friday, Oct. 16, 2015, in San Antonio. Philip Carney said that three years after starting a restorative discipline program as principal of Ed White Middle School in San Antonio, out-of-school suspensions have dropped by 72 percent. Eric Gay / AP Photo
School Punishments
Using a restorative justice model, which includes teachers and students gathering in circles for discussions, seventh graders Sarah Reusser, second from left, and Jayden Witter, top right, talk with Jackie Wade, bottom left, assistant principal Rufus Lott, third from left, assistant principal Sara Tompkins, Phillip Carney, bottom right, and counselor Betty Arredondo, bottom center, about a recent conflict, at Ed White Middle School, Friday, Oct. 16, 2015, in San Antonio. Philip Carney said that three years after starting a restorative discipline program as principal of Ed White Middle School in San Antonio, out-of-school suspensions have dropped by 72 percent. Eric Gay / AP Photo

Solutions To Violence In Chicago: Restorative Justice

Reset continues its “Solutions To Violence” series all week. Today, we’ll meet a veteran prosecutor who transitioned from her State’s Attorney career to become a restorative justice official in Illinois. Newer to the United States, restorative justice has been practiced in other countries for decades.

GUEST: Kathleen Bankhead, independent juvenile ombudsperson at the Department of Juvenile Justice; former prosecutor and assistant state’s attorney