Solutions To Violence In Chicago: Violence As A Public Health Issue

Violence Interrupters
In this July 24, 2018 photo, Alecia Armstrong bows her head during a prayer while participating in a Save Our Streets (S.O.S.) shooting response rally in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in New York. S.O.S. is one of a growing number of taxpayer-financed “violence interrupter” groups in the nation’s largest city that enlist former gang members to attack acts of violence like outbreaks of a disease that they must keep from spreading. Seth Wenig / AP Photo
Violence Interrupters
In this July 24, 2018 photo, Alecia Armstrong bows her head during a prayer while participating in a Save Our Streets (S.O.S.) shooting response rally in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in New York. S.O.S. is one of a growing number of taxpayer-financed “violence interrupter” groups in the nation’s largest city that enlist former gang members to attack acts of violence like outbreaks of a disease that they must keep from spreading. Seth Wenig / AP Photo

Solutions To Violence In Chicago: Violence As A Public Health Issue

Reset continues its “Solutions To Violence” series with Adler University, which for decades has guided the conversation of viewing violence primarily as a public health issue, rather than a criminal justice problem.

GUEST: Elena Quintana, executive director of Adler University’s Institute on Public Safety and Social Justice