Teaching 'America's Pastime' To The Rest Of The World

United States eagle statue mascot stands on the mound in celebration, a blue cap jauntily hanging from one of its large wings, after their 8-0 win over Puerto Rico in the final of the World Baseball Classic in Los Angeles, Wednesday, March 22, 2017.
United States eagle statue mascot stands on the mound in celebration, a blue cap jauntily hanging from one of its large wings, after their 8-0 win over Puerto Rico in the final of the World Baseball Classic in Los Angeles, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. Mark J. Terrill / AP Photo
United States eagle statue mascot stands on the mound in celebration, a blue cap jauntily hanging from one of its large wings, after their 8-0 win over Puerto Rico in the final of the World Baseball Classic in Los Angeles, Wednesday, March 22, 2017.
United States eagle statue mascot stands on the mound in celebration, a blue cap jauntily hanging from one of its large wings, after their 8-0 win over Puerto Rico in the final of the World Baseball Classic in Los Angeles, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. Mark J. Terrill / AP Photo

Teaching 'America's Pastime' To The Rest Of The World

Audio available later today.

The World Baseball Classic ended Wednesday night with the U.S. beating over Puerto Rico 8-0. 

While baseball is one of America’s most recognizable exports, the game still has yet to catch on in many parts of the world.  We speak with Peter Caliendo, baseball coaching consultant and former coach for the USA Baseball National Team, about the World Baseball Classic's future and the citizen diplomacy the sport provides.

As president of Caliendo Sports International, Caliendo treks around the globe to train coaches on how to teach the game. He also helps baseball players not good enough for the Major Leagues find work outside of the U.S.