The New Space Race

Indian Space Research Organization’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk III rocket lifts off from the space launch center in Sriharikota, India, Monday, June 5, 2017. India’s space agency on Monday successfully launched its heaviest rocket carrying a communication satellite from the launch pad off the country’s southeastern coast. (AP Photo)
Indian Space Research Organization’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk III rocket lifts off from the space launch center in Sriharikota, India, Monday, June 5, 2017. India’s space agency on Monday successfully launched its heaviest rocket carrying a communication satellite from the launch pad off the country’s southeastern coast. AP Photo
Indian Space Research Organization’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk III rocket lifts off from the space launch center in Sriharikota, India, Monday, June 5, 2017. India’s space agency on Monday successfully launched its heaviest rocket carrying a communication satellite from the launch pad off the country’s southeastern coast. (AP Photo)
Indian Space Research Organization’s Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk III rocket lifts off from the space launch center in Sriharikota, India, Monday, June 5, 2017. India’s space agency on Monday successfully launched its heaviest rocket carrying a communication satellite from the launch pad off the country’s southeastern coast. AP Photo

The New Space Race

When India sent its first Mars orbiter into space two years ago, not only were they the first country to do it on the first try, they did it for less money than it cost to make the film Gravity.

The superpowers that were competing in the original space race during the Cold War are no longer the only players in the game. We dig into the politics of space travel with Brian Harvey author of several books on the Russian, Chinese, Indian, Japanese and European space programs and contributor to Spaceflight magazine, Orbit, Astronomy and Space and the Journal of the British Interplanetary Society.