Trump Sends National Guard To Stop Caravan Fleeing U.S.-backed Regime

This April 2, 2017, file photo made with a drone, shows the U.S. Mexico border fence as it cuts through the two downtowns of Nogales.
This April 2, 2017, file photo made with a drone, shows the U.S. Mexico border fence as it cuts through the two downtowns of Nogales. Brian Skoloff / AP Photo
This April 2, 2017, file photo made with a drone, shows the U.S. Mexico border fence as it cuts through the two downtowns of Nogales.
This April 2, 2017, file photo made with a drone, shows the U.S. Mexico border fence as it cuts through the two downtowns of Nogales. Brian Skoloff / AP Photo

Trump Sends National Guard To Stop Caravan Fleeing U.S.-backed Regime

Every year, Pueblo Sin Fronteras, which translates to “people without borders,” organizes a caravan asylum seekers predominantly from Honduras to journey north to the United States border. Honduras has been in varying states of unrest for years, but many have been forced to leave the country after the U.S. certified an unconstitutional election last fall. President Juan Hernando Hernandez has been accused of massive human rights abuses , even while receiving hundreds of millions of dollars worth of support from the U.S. government. Yesterday, President Trump signed a proclamation aiming to send thousands of National Guard members to the border to meet the caravan of more than 1,000 asylum seekers. The president also remarked yesterday, without providing evidence, that women on the caravan “are raped at levels that nobody has ever seen before.” Worldview discusses the logistics of deploying the National Guard to the border and the plight of Honduran asylum-seekers with Dana Frank, a history professor with University of California at Santa Cruz.

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Dana Frank, a history professor with University of California at Santa Cruz