Vaccination and Public Health

BRAZIL VACCINATIONS
A health worker prepares a syringe with a vaccine against measles in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. Brazilian health authorities launch a nationwide vaccination campaign Monday against measles and polio, two diseases that are showing up in larger numbers in Latin America's largest nation after being all but eradicated. Leo Correa / AP Photo
BRAZIL VACCINATIONS
A health worker prepares a syringe with a vaccine against measles in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. Brazilian health authorities launch a nationwide vaccination campaign Monday against measles and polio, two diseases that are showing up in larger numbers in Latin America's largest nation after being all but eradicated. Leo Correa / AP Photo

Vaccination and Public Health

Recently Italy passed legislation that doesn’t require vaccination for school. Here in the United States each state has varying degrees of how difficult or easy it is to opt out of vaccination requirements. Illinois for example requires medical providers to sign off on religious and medical requests. Medical professionals fear that the growing number of people to opt out of vaccinates pose a risk to “herd immunity.” That’s the phenomenon where the spread of diseases are slowed down with less people to infect, thanks to increased resistance via vaccinations. Joining us will be Diane Peterson, Associate Director for Immunization Projects at the Immunization Action Coalition, Kelly McKenna, Manager for Immunization Initiative at EverThrive Illinois and Dr. Santina Wheat, Member of the Illinois Academy of Family Physicians, she is a doctor for Erie Family Health Centers.