Watchdog Report: ShotSpotter Alerts Rarely Lead To Evidence Of Gun-Related Crime

$33 million ShotSpotter is supposed to help police target gunshots, but a new report from Chicago’s Inspector General says it doesn’t work.

ShotSpotter
In this Aug. 10, 2021, file photo, a pedestrian walks with a dog at the intersection of South Stony Island Avenue and East 63rd Street where the ShotSpotter technology is in use above the crossroads. The gunshot detection system that Chicago has spent tens of millions of dollars on and has been touted as a critical component of the police department's effort to combat gun violence rarely produces evidence of gun-related crime in the city, the city's watchdog agency has concluded in a scathing report released on Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2021. Charles Rex Arbogast / Associated Press, File
ShotSpotter
In this Aug. 10, 2021, file photo, a pedestrian walks with a dog at the intersection of South Stony Island Avenue and East 63rd Street where the ShotSpotter technology is in use above the crossroads. The gunshot detection system that Chicago has spent tens of millions of dollars on and has been touted as a critical component of the police department's effort to combat gun violence rarely produces evidence of gun-related crime in the city, the city's watchdog agency has concluded in a scathing report released on Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2021. Charles Rex Arbogast / Associated Press, File

Watchdog Report: ShotSpotter Alerts Rarely Lead To Evidence Of Gun-Related Crime

$33 million ShotSpotter is supposed to help police target gunshots, but a new report from Chicago’s Inspector General says it doesn’t work.

ShotSpotter technology is used in cities across the country to alert police of gunshots in high-crime areas. But a new report from Chicago’s Inspector General says the gunshot detection system rarely leads to evidence of a gun-related crime.

GUEST: Deborah Witzburg, City of Chicago Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety