What Are U.S. Options To Address Syria Chemical Weapons Attack?

This photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, shows civilians carrying their belongings as they left the rebel-held suburb of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, Syria, Saturday, March. 24, 2018.
This photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, shows civilians carrying their belongings as they left the rebel-held suburb of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, Syria, Saturday, March. 24, 2018. SANA via AP
This photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, shows civilians carrying their belongings as they left the rebel-held suburb of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, Syria, Saturday, March. 24, 2018.
This photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, shows civilians carrying their belongings as they left the rebel-held suburb of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, Syria, Saturday, March. 24, 2018. SANA via AP

What Are U.S. Options To Address Syria Chemical Weapons Attack?

After an alleged chemical weapons attack killed dozens of civilians in Syria on Saturday, President Trump vowed to retaliate with missile attacks, tweeting that “President Putin, Russia and Iran are responsible for backing Animal Assad” and the Syrian regime should pay a “big price” for the “mindless” attack. The apparent toxic gas attack took place in Douma, a rebel-held area near the Syrian capital of Damascus that has been heavily bombed by the Assad regime. Trump criticized President Obama for backing down from his own “red line” with regard to Syrian use of Chemical weapons. Trump also argued in 2013 that Obama should not have “blurted [his plan] all over the media,” though Trump opposed any intervention in Syria at the time.

Joining us to discuss America’s position on Syria is Vali Nasr, dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He served as senior adviser to the U.S. special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan from 2009-2011.