What Pullman can teach us about community investment

pullman
In this Feb. 17, 2015, file photo, part of the 1910 iron fence stands in front of the Pullman Clock Tower and Administration building in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago. Supporters of the revitalization of Chicago's historic Pullman neighborhood say they have the money for more restoration work, five years after then-President Barack Obama designated part of the area as a national monument. A central part of the restoration is the Pullman Clock Tower and Administration building, which will convert into a visitors center. Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo
pullman
In this Feb. 17, 2015, file photo, part of the 1910 iron fence stands in front of the Pullman Clock Tower and Administration building in the Pullman neighborhood of Chicago. Supporters of the revitalization of Chicago's historic Pullman neighborhood say they have the money for more restoration work, five years after then-President Barack Obama designated part of the area as a national monument. A central part of the restoration is the Pullman Clock Tower and Administration building, which will convert into a visitors center. Charles Rex Arbogast / AP Photo

What Pullman can teach us about community investment

Since 2006, the Metropolitan Planning Council has seen a decrease in crime, poverty and unemployment in Pullman. They tie it to $340 million drawn in by Chicago Neighborhood Initiatives.

With President Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan and the federal CARES Act underway, the Council says such coordinated community investment is as crucial as ever.

GUESTS: MarySue Barrett, Metropolitan Planning Council president

Ciere Boatright, vice president of real estate and community development, former vice president of Chicago Neighborhood Initiatives

Bo Kemp, Southland Development Authority CEO