What To Know About COVID-19 Passports And Why They’re Stirring Debate

Experts say more vaccine passports are on the way. But critics are wary of privacy, security and equity concerns.

What To Know About COVID-19 Passports And Why They’re Stirring Debate
In this undated photo, provided by NY Governor's Press Office on Saturday March 27, 2021, is the new "Excelsior Pass" app, a digital pass that people can download to show proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test. Vaccine passports being developed to verify COVID-19 immunization status and allow inoculated people to more freely travel, shop and dine have become the latest flash point in America’s perpetual political wars, with Republicans portraying them as a heavy-handed intrusion into personal freedom and private health choices. NY Governor’s Press Office via AP, File
What To Know About COVID-19 Passports And Why They’re Stirring Debate
In this undated photo, provided by NY Governor's Press Office on Saturday March 27, 2021, is the new "Excelsior Pass" app, a digital pass that people can download to show proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test. Vaccine passports being developed to verify COVID-19 immunization status and allow inoculated people to more freely travel, shop and dine have become the latest flash point in America’s perpetual political wars, with Republicans portraying them as a heavy-handed intrusion into personal freedom and private health choices. NY Governor’s Press Office via AP, File

What To Know About COVID-19 Passports And Why They’re Stirring Debate

Experts say more vaccine passports are on the way. But critics are wary of privacy, security and equity concerns.

The Biden administration says it will not develop mandatory vaccine passports, but leaders and businesses around the world are split on the idea.

Reset takes a closer look at vaccine passports and why they’re stirring debate.

GUESTS: Ian Sherr, editor-at-large for CNET News

Steven Thrasher, assistant professor and Daniel Renberg chair of social justice in reporting at Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism