What’s Next For The Protesters At Standing Rock?

People walk along a snowy hillside in a storm at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Monday, Dec. 5, 2016. Many Dakota Access oil pipeline opponents who’ve gathered for months in the camp in southern North Dakota are committed to staying despite wintry weather and demands that they leave.
People walk along a snowy hillside in a storm at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D last week. Many Dakota Access oil pipeline opponents who've gathered for months in the camp in southern North Dakota are committed to staying despite wintry weather and demands that they leave. David Goldman / AP Photo
People walk along a snowy hillside in a storm at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Monday, Dec. 5, 2016. Many Dakota Access oil pipeline opponents who’ve gathered for months in the camp in southern North Dakota are committed to staying despite wintry weather and demands that they leave.
People walk along a snowy hillside in a storm at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D last week. Many Dakota Access oil pipeline opponents who've gathered for months in the camp in southern North Dakota are committed to staying despite wintry weather and demands that they leave. David Goldman / AP Photo

What’s Next For The Protesters At Standing Rock?

Blizzard conditions have hit the camp at Standing Rock as the Army Corps of Engineers announced it will not give a permit for the Dakota Access Pipeline to drill under the Missouri River.

Demonstrators, who are mainly of the Lakota tribe, set up camp last April to defy a $4 billion pipeline they claim will cause catastrophic damage to their lands and drinking water, as well as disturb ancient burial grounds.

For more on what’s next for Standing Rock, we turn to environmental ethicist, Michael Schuck, who visited the camp to support the protesters. We also hear from Al Eastman, a Lakota ecologist and spokesperson for the group Chicago in Solidarity with Standing Rock.