Why Lynching Is Still Not A Federal Crime

LYNCHING MEMORIAL
This April 28, 2018, file photo shows a poem by Toni Morrison inscribed on a wall at the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala. The organization that founded the nation’s first memorial to lynching victims announced Tuesday, June 16, 2020, that it has documented thousands of additional killings of black people during the era of Reconstruction. The Equal Justice Initiative said it has now documented nearly 6,500 lynchings of black people between 1877 and 1950. Beth J. Harpaz / AP Photo
LYNCHING MEMORIAL
This April 28, 2018, file photo shows a poem by Toni Morrison inscribed on a wall at the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala. The organization that founded the nation’s first memorial to lynching victims announced Tuesday, June 16, 2020, that it has documented thousands of additional killings of black people during the era of Reconstruction. The Equal Justice Initiative said it has now documented nearly 6,500 lynchings of black people between 1877 and 1950. Beth J. Harpaz / AP Photo

Why Lynching Is Still Not A Federal Crime

The killing of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia gave momentum to anti-lynching legislation that is currently stalled in the U.S. Congress.

Reset takes a comparative look at the past and present of America’s anti-lynching movement.

GUEST: Duchess Harris, professor of American Studies at Macalester College, author of Racially Writing The Republic: Racists, Race Rebels, and Transformations Of American Identity.