Why Some News Organizations Show Graphic Images Of War And Others Do Not

Napalm Girl: South Vietnamese forces follow terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang
South Vietnamese forces follow terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places on June 8, 1972. This Pulitzer Prize-winning image by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut was at the center of a heated debate in late 2016 about freedom of speech in Norway after Facebook deleted it from a Norwegian author’s page last month. Associated Press
Napalm Girl: South Vietnamese forces follow terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang
South Vietnamese forces follow terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places on June 8, 1972. This Pulitzer Prize-winning image by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut was at the center of a heated debate in late 2016 about freedom of speech in Norway after Facebook deleted it from a Norwegian author’s page last month. Associated Press

Why Some News Organizations Show Graphic Images Of War And Others Do Not

The news is no stranger to violence in the world. If it’s happening, journalists are reporting it. But what picture is running alongside the story? When compared to its international counterpart, American media can look vastly different, often giving the more palatable narrative of events. Morning Shift talks to Abderrahim Foukara, DC bureau chief for Al Jazeera TV, and Jim Kirk, editor-in-chief of the Chicago Sun-Times.