World History Moment: Invention Of RADAR

This new shortwave radio antenna, recently developed, is now installed at Glendale Airport to concentrate radio waves for the aid of airplane pilots and ground attendants with whom they communicate while traveling, shown Dec. 21, 1936.
This new shortwave radio antenna, recently developed, is now installed at Glendale Airport to concentrate radio waves for the aid of airplane pilots and ground attendants with whom they communicate while traveling, shown Dec. 21, 1936. AP Photo
This new shortwave radio antenna, recently developed, is now installed at Glendale Airport to concentrate radio waves for the aid of airplane pilots and ground attendants with whom they communicate while traveling, shown Dec. 21, 1936.
This new shortwave radio antenna, recently developed, is now installed at Glendale Airport to concentrate radio waves for the aid of airplane pilots and ground attendants with whom they communicate while traveling, shown Dec. 21, 1936. AP Photo

World History Moment: Invention Of RADAR

Radio, as a technology, has many uses beyond providing our favorite songs. In 1935, a group of scientists were devising a radio death ray when they discovered a way of tracking the placement of airplanes in the sky. The experiments proved very useful to the British during WW II.

Historian John Schmidt shares how the same radio waves we use to listen to WBEZ also helped defeat the Nazis.