Afternoon Shift: Forced displacement and housing insecurity in Chicago | WBEZ
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Afternoon Shift

Afternoon Shift: Forced displacement and housing insecurity in Chicago

(Flickr/JefferyTurner)

Exhibit explores forced displacement and housing insecurity in Chicago

An exhibit opened in Chicago last week called, “House of Cards: Rebuilding.” It features stories of Chicagoans who experience foreclosure, eviction, reverse mortgage scams and forced displacement. One person who knows these stories very well is Roberta Feldman, the curator of “House of Cards: Rebuilding,” and she joins us in studio along with Ernie Lukasik, a homeowner who has his own experience with housing insecurity.

Guests:
  • Roberta Feldman is curator of House of Cards: Rebuilding.
  • Ernie Lukasik is a Chicagoan who went through a three-year foreclosure with his wife. He is also a Cook County Circuit Court Mediation Outreach worker.

Chicago doctor's memoirs show the light-hearted side of cardiology

Cardiothoracic surgeon, Dr. Constantine “Dino” Tatooles, has been at the forefront of cardiothoracic surgery. The Chicago native has traveled the world perfecting life-saving procedures including the quintuple bypass surgery, which saved his own life. Dr. Tatooles shares his experiences in a new book, “Heartbeats,” written by his brother, James Tatooles. The Tatooles brothers join us in the studio to share their story.

Guests:

  • Dr. Constantine “Dino” Tatooles is a cardiothoracic surgeon.
  • James Tatooles is the author of "Heartbeats."

'India's Daughter' director talks about the inspiration behind the film

Documentary filmmaker Leslee Udwin was in Chicago this past weekend for a screening of “India’s Daughter,” which has been banned in India. It explores the complex issues surrounding sexual assault and gender inequity in India. We  sat down with Leslee to discuss the film and its reception in India and abroad.

Guest: Leslee Udwin is a documentary filmmaker and the director of ‘India’s Daughter.’

What could canine flu mean for your pets?

Earlier this week, researchers reported that a canine flu that has sickened more than 1,000 dogs in Chicago and the Midwest may not be what we think it is. Scientists from Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin report that at least some of the cases might come from an Asian strain known as H3N2. What are the implications for your dog and even your cat? We talk to Dr. Rae Ann Van Pelt, of Lincoln Park’s Family Pet Animal Hospital, about the latest on this Asian strain.

Guest: Dr. Rae Ann Van Pelt is a veterinarian and co-founder of Family Pet Animal Hospital.

New study may reveal why overnight workers are more likely to get diabetes

A study published yesterday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences may be able to answer why overnight and swing-shift workers are at a higher risk of diabetes. It's not just the lack of healthy food options that are available for people working odd hours. As the research indicates, the human body appears to process glucose levels differently at different times of day. Frank Scheer is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Director of the Medical Chronobiology Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and he co-authored the study. He joins us with more.

Guest: Frank Scheer is an assistant professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Medical Chronobiology Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Tech Shift: Healthcare IT conference highlights Chicago's growing health tech hub

Right now an organization called Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society is bringing together professionals, clinicians, executives and vendors from around the world for its annual conference and exhibition.  The event is happening in Chicago this week and Steven Collens, CEO of MATTER, Chicago’s new healthcare technology startup center and community hub, is delivering one of the conference’s key notes and he joins us in studio with more.

Guest: Steven Collens is the CEO of MATTER.

Wanda-Vista Tower could become Chicago's third tallest skyscraper

New plans have been unveiled for what could become the third tallest skyscraper in Chicago. Pending any changes, the Wanda-Vista Tower would be built just north of Millenium Park and would be completed by 2019. The 93-story, three-tiered tower would rise 1,144 feet, 8 feet higher than the Aon Center. Chicago architect Edward Keegan has been keeping an eye on this project, and he joins us in studio.

Guest: Edward Keegan is a Chicago architect.

Chicago torture victims could millions in reparations

Mayor Rahm Emanuel is supporting a $5.5 million reparations package for victims of Jon Burge, the notorious former Chicago Police Department detective accused of torturing hundreds of people in custody in the 1980s. The City Council had been pushing for a $20 million dollar package for more than a year. Hearings were held today and tomorrow, the City Council will take up the matter. Alderman Joe Moreno, one of the legislators behind the reparations package, and WBEZ’s Katie O’Brien join us with details.

Guest:

Faith communities area coming out in support of reparations for Chicago torture victims

Different faith communities throughout Chicago took part in today’s hearings about reparations for the victims of torture under former CPD detective Jon Burge. Randall Blakey is the executive pastor at the Lasalle Street Church, and he joins us with details from today’s hearings.  

Guest: Randall Blakey is executive pastor at LaSalle Street Church.

 

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