A Geopolitical Look At The U.S. Presidential Election

In this Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis. Trump gets outsized attention for what he’s tweeting and retweeting on a near-daily basis. But Clinton has a formidable digital media army, her own app and a rapid response team ready to blast out shareable soundbites from convention speeches, photos, videos and even temporary location-specific Snapchat filters mocking Republicans.
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis. John Locher / AP Photo
In this Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis. Trump gets outsized attention for what he’s tweeting and retweeting on a near-daily basis. But Clinton has a formidable digital media army, her own app and a rapid response team ready to blast out shareable soundbites from convention speeches, photos, videos and even temporary location-specific Snapchat filters mocking Republicans.
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis. John Locher / AP Photo

A Geopolitical Look At The U.S. Presidential Election

All major polls show the Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton with a close, but comfortable lead over Republican candidate, Donald Trump, and as we head towards Election Day, many world leaders and observers are watching.

We look at the elections from a geopolitical perspective with Steve Clemons, security analyst and Washington Editor-at-large of The Atlantic.