Canada Unveils Plan To Nationalize Controversial Pipeline

A small group of demonstrators protesting Canada's Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion chant as Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau leaves a hotel steps away following a meeting Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Seattle. Trudeau met with Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee to discuss trade, regional economic development, and climate.
A small group of demonstrators protesting Canada's Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion chant as Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau leaves a hotel steps away following a meeting Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Seattle. Trudeau met with Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee to discuss trade, regional economic development, and climate. Elaine Thompson / AP Photo
A small group of demonstrators protesting Canada's Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion chant as Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau leaves a hotel steps away following a meeting Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Seattle. Trudeau met with Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee to discuss trade, regional economic development, and climate.
A small group of demonstrators protesting Canada's Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion chant as Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau leaves a hotel steps away following a meeting Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Seattle. Trudeau met with Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee to discuss trade, regional economic development, and climate. Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

Canada Unveils Plan To Nationalize Controversial Pipeline

Canada’s Liberal government announced a plan last week to buy a controversial oil pipeline to sell crude oil from Manitoba to East Asian markets. The pipeline was being built by Texas-based contractor Kinder Morgan. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau cited Canada’s dependence on the U.S. economy as a reason to nationalize the pipeline and diversify Canadian exports. Trudeau has opposition to the plan from conservatives and environmentalists alike. “I was raised to believe that the growth of the economy and the protection of the environment go together,” said Trudeau. The plan cost the government $4.5 billion. We’re joined by Kathryn Harrison, a professor of political science at the University of British Columbia, to discuss.