Nigeria’s Battle Against Boko Haram

In this Wednesday April 8, 2015 file photo, Nigerian soldiers man a checkpoint in Gwoza, Nigeria, a town newly liberated from Boko Haram. Nigeria’s president has exaggerated the military’s success against Boko Haram, say officials in northern Nigeria in response to an American commander’s testimony that the Islamic extremist group still holds territory.
In this Wednesday April 8, 2015 file photo, Nigerian soldiers man a checkpoint in Gwoza, Nigeria, a town newly liberated from Boko Haram. Lekan Oyekanmi / AP Photo
In this Wednesday April 8, 2015 file photo, Nigerian soldiers man a checkpoint in Gwoza, Nigeria, a town newly liberated from Boko Haram. Nigeria’s president has exaggerated the military’s success against Boko Haram, say officials in northern Nigeria in response to an American commander’s testimony that the Islamic extremist group still holds territory.
In this Wednesday April 8, 2015 file photo, Nigerian soldiers man a checkpoint in Gwoza, Nigeria, a town newly liberated from Boko Haram. Lekan Oyekanmi / AP Photo

Nigeria’s Battle Against Boko Haram

Last month, Nigerian troops freed hundreds of people who had been held hostage by the militant group Boko Haram. But the more than 200 school girls who were kidnapped from Chibok in 2014 still remain missing. 

Nigeria’s president Muhammadu Buhari has said that Nigeria has said Nigeria has "technically won the war" against Islamist Boko Haram militants. Boko Haram is said to be responsible for the displacement of more than two million people in Nigeria. 

We talk about Buhari’s efforts to defeat Boko Haram with Richard Joseph, professor of international history and politics at Northwestern University, a senior fellow of the Brookings Institution.