Prince Naruhito Enthroned As Emperor Of Japan

Japan’s Emperor Akihito, second from right, accompanied by Empress Michiko, attends the ceremony of his abdication in front of other members of the royal families and top government officials at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, Tuesday, April 30, 2019. The 85-year-old Akihito ends his three-decade reign on Tuesday as his son Crown Prince Naruhito will ascend the Chrysanthemum throne on Wednesday
Japan's Emperor Akihito, second from right, accompanied by Empress Michiko, attends the ceremony of his abdication in front of other members of the royal families and top government officials at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, Tuesday, April 30, 2019. The 85-year-old Akihito ends his three-decade reign on Tuesday as his son Crown Prince Naruhito will ascend the Chrysanthemum throne on Wednesday AP Photo
Japan’s Emperor Akihito, second from right, accompanied by Empress Michiko, attends the ceremony of his abdication in front of other members of the royal families and top government officials at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, Tuesday, April 30, 2019. The 85-year-old Akihito ends his three-decade reign on Tuesday as his son Crown Prince Naruhito will ascend the Chrysanthemum throne on Wednesday
Japan's Emperor Akihito, second from right, accompanied by Empress Michiko, attends the ceremony of his abdication in front of other members of the royal families and top government officials at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, Tuesday, April 30, 2019. The 85-year-old Akihito ends his three-decade reign on Tuesday as his son Crown Prince Naruhito will ascend the Chrysanthemum throne on Wednesday AP Photo

Prince Naruhito Enthroned As Emperor Of Japan

A new era begins in Japan on Wednesday. Emperor Akihito abdicated his throne on Tuesday. His eldest son, Crown Prince Naruhito, ascends the following day. The change ushers in the era of Reiwa (order and harmony). While the emperor has no political power, he is the country’s figurehead, as part of the world’s oldest continuing hereditary monarchy. By law, women cannot inherit the throne, meaning the new emperor’s only child, a daughter, cannot succeed him. Joining Worldview to discuss the first Japanese abdication in over 200 years is Linda Hasunuma, a visiting assistant professor of political science at the University of Bridgeport. She weighs in on what to expect from the new emperor’s leadership, as well as the gender politics surrounding the Japanese monarchy.