Terrorism And Refugees, What Is The Real Risk?

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., joined by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., center and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., meets with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, following GOP strategy session. Ryan gave a strong defense of President Donald Trump’s refugee and immigration ban to caucus members and said he backs the executive order, which has created chaos and confusion worldwide.
House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., joined by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., center and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., meets with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, following GOP strategy session. Ryan gave a strong defense of President Donald Trump's refugee and immigration ban to caucus members and said he backs the executive order, which has created chaos and confusion worldwide. J. Scott Applewhite/AP
House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., joined by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., center and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., meets with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, following GOP strategy session. Ryan gave a strong defense of President Donald Trump’s refugee and immigration ban to caucus members and said he backs the executive order, which has created chaos and confusion worldwide.
House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., joined by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., center and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., meets with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, following GOP strategy session. Ryan gave a strong defense of President Donald Trump's refugee and immigration ban to caucus members and said he backs the executive order, which has created chaos and confusion worldwide. J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Terrorism And Refugees, What Is The Real Risk?

President Trump says the executive order on extreme vetting, which bans the entry of citizens from seven Muslim countries, is not about religion but rather “is about terror and keeping our country safe.” But a study last year by the CATO Institute found that the chance of an American being murdered in a terrorist attack caused by a refugee is 1 in 3.64 billion per year. The study tracked data beginning in 1975. Research also suggests that immigrants commit crimes at rates much lower than the rest of the population.

Alex Nowrasteh, an immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute’s Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity, joins us to talk about the findings.