Trump To Send More Troops To Afghanistan

FILE - In this April 17, 2017, file photo, a U.S. soldier patrols in Asad Khil village near the site of a U.S. bombing in the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan. As the administration of President Donald Trump weighs sending more troops to Afghanistan, the 16-year war grinds on in bloody stalemate. Afghan soldiers are suffering what Pentagon auditors call “shockingly high” battlefield casualties, and prospects are narrowing for a negotiated peace settlement with the Taliban.
A U.S. soldier patrols in Asad Khil village near the site of a U.S. bombing in the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan. As the administration of President Donald Trump plans to send more troops to Afghanistan, the 16-year war grinds on in bloody stalemate. Rahmat Gul / AP Photo
FILE - In this April 17, 2017, file photo, a U.S. soldier patrols in Asad Khil village near the site of a U.S. bombing in the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan. As the administration of President Donald Trump weighs sending more troops to Afghanistan, the 16-year war grinds on in bloody stalemate. Afghan soldiers are suffering what Pentagon auditors call “shockingly high” battlefield casualties, and prospects are narrowing for a negotiated peace settlement with the Taliban.
A U.S. soldier patrols in Asad Khil village near the site of a U.S. bombing in the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan. As the administration of President Donald Trump plans to send more troops to Afghanistan, the 16-year war grinds on in bloody stalemate. Rahmat Gul / AP Photo

Trump To Send More Troops To Afghanistan

President Donald Trump plans to send as many as 5,000 American troops to Afghanistan. Meanwhile, Afghan warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar has returned to the country after nearly 20 years in exile. The peace deal that facilitated his return is viewed by many observers as a model for lasting peace in the country.

For more on the possibilities for peace and security in Afghanistan we turn to Barnett Rubin, senior fellow and associate director of the Afghanistan Pakistan Regional Program at New York University’s Center on International Cooperation.