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Quinn Talks Ethics, Taxes, Vets in Lengthy State of the State

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Quinn Talks Ethics, Taxes, Vets in Lengthy State of the State

(AP/Seth Perlman)

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn used his first traditional “State of the State” address to highlight his record, push again for more tax revenue and salute veterans.

The one hour 12 minute speech included references to Abe Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Paul Simon, two Roosevelts and a tribute to Secretary of State Jesse White. Quinn struck his usual populist tone, noting he uses his VIP card at a discount hotel chain, and lobbying for a constitutional amendment to let voters put ethics reforms on the ballot.

QUINN: Democracy is a process that goes on year after year, and it’s very important that we bring the people in to our Democracy and let them set the rules for our conduct and our behaviors.

Quinn didn’t talk directly about the state’s deep budget problems until more than 45 minutes into his speech. He reiterated his call to bring in more tax revenue, while - he says - making the system more fair.

The campaign of Comptroller Dan Hynes, Quinn’s opponent in next month’s primary election, released a statement calling the speech a “rambling and unfocused performance” that lacked “concrete plans.”

Related: Listen to complete State of the State address

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