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Teacher Evaluations to Be Tied to Student Learning

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Teacher Evaluations to Be Tied to Student Learning

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn was at Wells High School to sign two bills related to teacher quality. (WBEZ/Linda Lutton)

A new law signed by Illinois Governor Pat Quinn Friday paves the way for teachers and principals to be evaluated based on their students’ progress.

Wells

Community High School
senior Hugo Macias thinks it’s a good idea for his teachers to be judged on how much he learns.

MACIAS: They’re getting paid for what they’re doing. And some teachers really don’t take the time to plan out their lessons.

His English teacher, Maria Amador, agrees it could keep principals and teachers accountable.

AMADOR: At the same time I also think we should be provided with the resources we need to hold the students to the higher standards.

Many believe current evaluations don’t distinguish good teachers from bad. A study shows more than 90 percent of teachers in the state’s biggest districts receive ratings of “superior” or “excellent.”

Teachers unions had a hand in writing the legislation.

The law boosts the state’s chances at capturing some $400 million under the U.S. Department of Education’s competitive Race to the Top grant.

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