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Money Is Flowing For Big Banks. For Unemployed Americans, It's About To Be Cut Off

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A woman rides past the New York Stock Exchange on July 13 at Wall Street in New York City.

Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

The United States had 71,000 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday. Back in June, Dr. Anthony Fauci said he wouldn't be surprised to see 100,00 cases per day. That grim prediction is getting closer to reality.

While the economy is in a recession and tens of millions of people have lost jobs, some big banks are enjoying huge profits.

Three unemployed workers from different parts of the country share what options they have once the federal CARES Act benefits expire at the end of July.

Indivar Dutta-Gupta, co-executive director of Georgetown University's Center on Poverty and Inequality, told NPR that the expiration of CARES Act benefits will not only hurt those workers relying on them — but the economy as a whole.

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