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Breonna Taylor Was Killed By Police 1 Year Ago. What's Changed Since Then?

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Breonna Taylor Was Killed By Police 1 Year Ago. What's Changed Since Then?

Breonna Taylor, here in December, would have turned 27 on Friday. Her friends and family remember Taylor as a caring person who loved her job in health care and enjoyed playing cards with her aunts.

Taylor Family

It's been one year since Breonna Taylor was shot and killed by police in her own apartment. In that year, Taylor's name has become a national symbol in the fight against racial injustice and police violence. But beyond the symbolism, many feel that actual progress has been disappointing.

In Louisville, Taylor's death has made other young Black women reflect on their own safety. Reporter Jess Clark of member station WFPL spoke to Black high school students who say Taylor's death changed the way they look at police.

Amid the national protests against police brutality and systemic racism, Kentucky State Rep. Attica Scott marched with her daughter. A year later and Scott has introduced legislation in Taylor's name that would ban no-knock search warrants, among other things. Scott spoke with NPR about what change she has seen in the last year.

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