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4 Countries Dominate Doses As Pressure Grows For Global Vaccine Solutions

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4 Countries Dominate Doses As Pressure Grows For Global Vaccine Solutions

A nurse administers a shot at a Covid-19 mass vaccination site at Martinsville speedway in Ridgeway, Virginia on March 12, 2021. - Community leaders, the heads of the Sovah Health hospital, and the speedway all came out to help and support the hospital nurses and the Virginia Department of Health in the mass vaccination campaign for this rural area in Virginia. The Virginia Department of Health said that vaccine distribution has been based on population and Covid-19 rates. But moving forward, the department said it is considering tweaks to ensure more geographical and racial equity in vaccine distribution. Health workers in the United States have administered more than 100 million Covid-19 vaccine doses, an official tracker showed on march 12. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images)

ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

More than half of worldwide vaccine doses have been administered in just four countries — India, China, the U.K. and the U.S. That kind of inequity will "extend the pandemic, globally," says Tom Bollyky, director of the Global Health program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

NPR's Tamara Keith reports on the growing pressure for the Biden administration to step up its vaccine diplomacy.

NPR's Lauren Frayer tours the largest vaccine factory in the world's top vaccine producing-country, India — a country poised for an even bigger role in global vaccine distribution. You can see photos and more from her report on the Serum Institute of India here.

Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Jason Beaubien.

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Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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