Your NPR news source

Yeah, The Supply Chain Situation Isn't Looking Great For The Holidays

SHARE Yeah, The Supply Chain Situation Isn't Looking Great For The Holidays
Yeah, The Supply Chain Situation Isn't Looking Great For The Holidays

BALTIMORE, MD - NOVEMBER 10: U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about the recently passed $1.2 trillion Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act at the Port of Baltimore on November 10, 2021 in Baltimore, Maryland. President Biden will sign the bill next week, where he plans to bring Democrats and Republicans to the White House for a ceremony to mark the bipartisan bill’s passage. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The holiday shopping season is basically here. But a lot of things that Americans want to buy are not. Now the race is on to get goods off ships and into stores and warehouses — before it's too late.

NPRs Scott Horsley reports some retailers are already feeling the pinch from less inventory and higher shipping costs.

Even if goods do make it into the U.S., many are sitting in warehouses, which are bursting at the seams. NPR's Alina Selyukh explains why.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

More From This Show
The Girl Scouts have been part of American childhood for generations. And now that quintessential experience is helping young girls, who are new to the United States get a sense of belonging. It comes through a Girl Scout troop based in one of New York City’s largest migrant shelters. The shelter has around 3,500 migrants, and all of the Girl Scouts are children of families seeking asylum. For the last few weeks, NPR’s Jasmine Garsd has been spending time with them, and brings us their their story. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy