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Russia May Be Able To Attack Ukraine From The Inside

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Russia May Be Able To Attack Ukraine From The Inside

KYIV, UKRAINE - FEBRUARY 15: A woman walks past a man selling vintage items on the street on February 15, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. According to recent announcements by U.S President Biden’s national security teams, the White House has warned of an ‘immediate’ threat of Russian invasion in Ukraine sighting February 16 as a possible invasion day, however Russia has announced that it would pull back some of it’s troops in a potential move towards de-escalation. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Despite reports that Russia may have withdrawn some troops from the Ukraine border, NATO says there's no evidence of de-escalation and forces remain ready to attack. But it's not just the border that is at risk.

NPR correspondent Frank Langfitt reports on hybrid war tactics like cyberattacks that Russia can, and may already be using to spark unrest in Ukraine.

And Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Russian journalist Vladimir Pozner about how the crisis feels in his country.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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