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Cold Feet: Time To Call Off The Wedding, Or Chill?

Sometimes the pressure or expense of a pending wedding can cloud judgment about whether to call it off.

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There’s a lot to think about before approaching the altar.

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For some brides and grooms-to-be, even a heat wave in the thick of wedding season isn’t enough to ward off cold feet.

Sometimes the pressure or expense of a pending wedding can cloud judgment about whether to call it off.

Syndicated advice columnist Amy Dickinson talks about how to handle degrees of cold — and cool — feet.

She thinks it can be tough to heed cold feet, these days, when “people feel very locked in” by the money and contractual obligations at stake in a wedding. Plus, getting married without premarital counseling is more common. Dickinson sums it up for NPR’s Tony Cox: “It’s sort of weddings run amok.”

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