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Higher education: The view from the top of the Roosevelt University Auditorium Building

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Higher education: The view from the top of the Roosevelt University Auditorium Building

WBEZ/Lee Bey

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The Adler & Sullivan-designed Auditorium Building has complemented the streetscape and skyline since 1889.

And looking out on the city from the top of the tower that crowns the 122-year-old landmark (and home to Roosevelt University), the building returns the favor. Nineteen stories above the corner of Congress and Michigan, it’s a view few get to see--but, man, is it a good one. The above photo looks south and you can see the EL snaking down the right side of the photo; the Congress Hotel is on the left. In the distance you can see the residential towers along Roosevelt Road seven blocks south.

And below, an eastward look. At the center of the photo, Congress Street splits Grant Park before dead-ending at Buckingham Fountain. And just beyond that, the sky and the lake become one:

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And here, a view to the southwest.

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I was on the roof of the Auditorium building because I was photographing the new 32-story Roosevelt Tower, a Roosevelt University dorm building under construction next door to the college on Wabash. The $118 million structure was designed by VOA Architects. I’ll post some photos soon. Imagine what the views from that place will look like.

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