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I Define Myself: Undocumented and Unafraid

The Jane Addams Hull-House Museum at the University of Illinois at Chicago opens I Define Myself: Unapologetic and Unafraid, a collaborative immigrant portrait project between the museum and members of the undocumented immigrant campaign “Coming Out of the Shadows.”

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The Jane Addams Hull-House Museum at the University of Illinois at Chicago opens I Define Myself: Unapologetic and Unafraid, a collaborative immigrant portrait project between the museum and members of the undocumented immigrant campaign “Coming Out of the Shadows.” Sixteen large-scale portraits hang on the property of the historic Hull-House Museum. The 4 by 5 foot canvases give visibility to undocumented individuals. The faces on display conjure images of the thousands of immigrants who passed through the doors of the Hull-House Settlement, illuminating the Museum’s rich tradition of supporting immigrant rights.

The opening reception features performances by Kristiana Colon, Melissa Duprey, Sydney Charles, Carla Navoa, Jorge Mena, Alaa Mukahhal, Ireri Unzueta Carrasco, Andrea Rosales, Jose Martinez, and David Ramierez.

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Recorded Thursday, June 28, 2012 at the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum.

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