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School report cards don't report ISAT scores

SHARE School report cards don't report ISAT scores

Chicago is handing out new report cards to each of its schools. The grades are meant to spark discussion between parents and schools about how to improve.

At Spry Community School, Principal Nilda Medina says the report cards are about transparency. “For the parents and the teachers as well, and for administrators, this is where we are at,” she said.

At Spry, some things looked good, she said. “Well, student attendance—that’s outstanding. It’s 96.2. Safety—our students feel that they’re very safe here—safe coming to school.”

The report cards feature teacher attendance rates, and even report on whether the school is offering students enough healthy food and exercise. They don’t report ISAT scores—which have come under fire lately for overstating student achievement.

Many Spry parents who came to school to get their own children’s grades seemed unphased by their school’s designation as a “middle-performing school that needs improvement.”

Parent Martha Del Villar said she’s satisfied with Spry, and quipped that if parents had complaints, it would probably be about their kids, not the teachers.

The district would not say how many schools received its lowest score. It’s said those schools are at risk of being closed down.

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