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Notre Dame University Virus Outbreak

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Notre Dame Cancels Classes For 2 Weeks After A COVID-19 Spike

Notre Dame University on Tuesday canceled in-person undergraduate classes for two weeks after a spike of coronavirus cases that occurred since the semester began Aug. 10.

University president the Rev. John Jenkins says he decided against sending students home after consulting with health care experts. Instead, the university is imposing restrictions on student activity, including limiting access to dormitories to residents and barring students from major gathering places on campus.

Jenkins said there have been 147 confirmed cases of coronavirus on campus since the start of classes.

“It is very serious and we must take serious actions,” Jenkins said in an address to students and staff.

Tuesday’s action by Notre Dame follows the decision by officials of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to switch to remote learning starting Wednesday.

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