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Biden Wants To Re-Open Schools, But How Much Can He Really Do About It?

President Biden has made reopening schools a benchmark for how his administration is handling the pandemic. It is a politically tricky goal, since those decisions will be made by local districts. We look at the roadblocks to achieving that goal and what the political fight might look like.

This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and education correspondent Cory Turner.

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Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.
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SHARE Biden Wants To Re-Open Schools, But How Much Can He Really Do About It?

President Biden has made reopening schools a benchmark for how his administration is handling the pandemic. It is a politically tricky goal, since those decisions will be made by local districts. We look at the roadblocks to achieving that goal and what the political fight might look like.

This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and education correspondent Cory Turner.

Connect:
Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.
Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.
Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Find and support your local public radio station.

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