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Harold Washington waves to cheering supporters on Tuesday night, April 7, 1987 as he announced victory in his bid for re-election as mayor of Chicago. At left is Rev, Jesse Jackson.

Harold Washington waves to cheering supporters on Tuesday night, April 7, 1987 as he announced victory in his bid for re-election as mayor of Chicago. At left is Rev, Jesse Jackson.

Fred Jewell

Remembering Chicago’s first Black Mayor on his would-be 100th birthday

Harold Washington died months into his second term as Chicago’s first Black mayor, but he left an impact people can still see in the city today.For the 100th anniversary of his birth, Reset reflects on Washington’s life and legacy. Plus, we learn about different ways you can commemorate his contributions to Chicago, including a new exhibit at the Harold Washington Library and a virtual political roundtable.

GUESTS: Stacie Williams, division chief of archives and special collections at the Chicago Public Library

Lynn Sweet, Washington Bureau Chief for the Chicago Sun-Times

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