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Heavy rain and storm surge from Hurricane Ida caused flooding from Louisiana to New England in September 2021. Homes in the town of French Settlement, La., were still underwater four days after the storm made landfall. Climate change is driving more flood risk in the U.S.

Heavy rain and storm surge from Hurricane Ida caused flooding from Louisiana to New England in September 2021. Homes in the town of French Settlement, La., were still underwater four days after the storm made landfall. Climate change is driving more flood risk in the U.S.

Bill Feig/AP

It’s not too late to curb the worst effects of climate change, but scientists say we must act now

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), of the U.N. has published three reports that show that humans are responsible for climate change, that the ability of humans and municipalities to adapt and live with severe weather is still possible if we act now, and that we have less than 2 and a half years to stop the rise of greenhouse gasses. Many are calling it the most stark warning yet.

Reset checks in with a climate scientist and an environmental reporter to understand these reports and the ways we can still stave off the worst.

GUESTS: Kristina Dahl, principal climate scientist for the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists

Michael Hawthorne, Chicago Tribune environment and public health reporter

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