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Banned Books

Banned books are visible at the Central Library, a branch of the Brooklyn Public Library system, in New York City on Thursday, July 7, 2022. The books are banned in several public schools and libraries in the U.S., but young people can read digital versions from anywhere through the library. The Brooklyn Public Library offers free membership to anyone in the U.S. aged 13 to 21 who wants to check out and read books digitally in response to the nationwide wave of book censorship and restrictions. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)

Ted Shaffrey

Banned Books

Banned books are visible at the Central Library, a branch of the Brooklyn Public Library system, in New York City on Thursday, July 7, 2022. The books are banned in several public schools and libraries in the U.S., but young people can read digital versions from anywhere through the library. The Brooklyn Public Library offers free membership to anyone in the U.S. aged 13 to 21 who wants to check out and read books digitally in response to the nationwide wave of book censorship and restrictions. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)

Ted Shaffrey

How Chicago-area libraries are fighting book bans

After numerous parent complaints, Chicagoland libraries are combating widespread calls for removal of various children’s books.

Banned books are visible at the Central Library, a branch of the Brooklyn Public Library system, in New York City on Thursday, July 7, 2022. The books are banned in several public schools and libraries in the U.S., but young people can read digital versions from anywhere through the library. The Brooklyn Public Library offers free membership to anyone in the U.S. aged 13 to 21 who wants to check out and read books digitally in response to the nationwide wave of book censorship and restrictions. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)

Ted Shaffrey

   

Some parents say they are exercising a First Amendment right to protest a variety of children’s books about LGBT acceptance and body positivity, including The Hips on the Drag Queen Go Swish, Swish, Swish and The Bare Naked Book.

Reset hears from a WBEZ journalist covering the issue and a local library leader.

GUESTS: Adora Namigadde, WBEZ metro reporter

Lindsey Dorfman, executive director of the Glenview Public Library

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