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60 years after the Civil Rights Act, women make 82 cents for every dollar men make

In this June 15, 2018 photo, twenty dollar bills are counted in North Andover, Mass. Financial envy is common — we see what others have and wish we had it, too — but it can also be destructive. Financial therapists say that the most effective way to deal with those feelings is to explore what is really behind them. Perhaps you want to increase your own savings goals, adjust your vacation plans or explore what truly makes you feel content, which might have nothing to do with money. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

60 years after the Civil Rights Act, women make 82 cents for every dollar men make

In this June 15, 2018 photo, twenty dollar bills are counted in North Andover, Mass. Financial envy is common — we see what others have and wish we had it, too — but it can also be destructive. Financial therapists say that the most effective way to deal with those feelings is to explore what is really behind them. Perhaps you want to increase your own savings goals, adjust your vacation plans or explore what truly makes you feel content, which might have nothing to do with money. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

60 years after the Civil Rights Act, women make 82 cents for every dollar men make

The pay gap between men and women hasn't narrowed much after growth in the '80s and '90s.

In this June 15, 2018 photo, twenty dollar bills are counted in North Andover, Mass. Financial envy is common — we see what others have and wish we had it, too — but it can also be destructive. Financial therapists say that the most effective way to deal with those feelings is to explore what is really behind them. Perhaps you want to increase your own savings goals, adjust your vacation plans or explore what truly makes you feel content, which might have nothing to do with money. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

   

In recent decades, more women have pursued higher education and have joined the workforce — helping narrow the wage gap between men and women during the '80s and '90s. But that progress has stalled over the past two decades, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis.

Reset discusses why things are slowing down at the national level, and checks in with organizations that are working to close the gap in the Chicago area.

GUESTS: Sharmili Majmudar, executive vice president of policy and organizational impact at Women Employed

Felicia Davis Blakley, president and CEO of Chicago Foundation for Women

Rakesh Kochhar, senior researcher at Pew Research Center

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