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Protecting LGBTQ youth

Erika Knott, left, wife of Kelly Bryson, holds her son, Jeremy Knott, 6, as they participate in a celebration rally in Jackson Square in New Orleans, Wednesday, June 26, 2013. Legally married to her longtime partner in Canada in 2007, Bryson is talking about a second wedding, in the United States this time, in light of Wednesday’s Supreme Court ruling striking down of a law denying federal benefits to married gay couples. Same sex marriage and civil unions remain illegal in Louisiana. And the full implications of the DOMA decision were not entirely clear for people living outside the 13 states where gay marriage is recognized. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Gerald Herbert

Protecting LGBTQ youth

Erika Knott, left, wife of Kelly Bryson, holds her son, Jeremy Knott, 6, as they participate in a celebration rally in Jackson Square in New Orleans, Wednesday, June 26, 2013. Legally married to her longtime partner in Canada in 2007, Bryson is talking about a second wedding, in the United States this time, in light of Wednesday’s Supreme Court ruling striking down of a law denying federal benefits to married gay couples. Same sex marriage and civil unions remain illegal in Louisiana. And the full implications of the DOMA decision were not entirely clear for people living outside the 13 states where gay marriage is recognized. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Gerald Herbert

Coming Out: Supporting LGBTQ children

TK

Erika Knott, left, wife of Kelly Bryson, holds her son, Jeremy Knott, 6, as they participate in a celebration rally in Jackson Square in New Orleans, Wednesday, June 26, 2013. Legally married to her longtime partner in Canada in 2007, Bryson is talking about a second wedding, in the United States this time, in light of Wednesday’s Supreme Court ruling striking down of a law denying federal benefits to married gay couples. Same sex marriage and civil unions remain illegal in Louisiana. And the full implications of the DOMA decision were not entirely clear for people living outside the 13 states where gay marriage is recognized. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Gerald Herbert

   

How can a parent of a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning child help them feel safe and protected, especially at a time when anti-LGBTQ laws and bills are on the rise in the U.S.?

Reset hears from two Chicago families about their experience supporting their LGBTQ kids and navigating their coming out.

GUESTS: Florrie Chapa, member of the Mama Bears

Javier Chapa, coordinator of outreach services at Howard Brown Health

B.T. Harman, founder of Harbor

Mike Mazzeo, member of Howard Brown Health’s board of directors

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