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A hand holds a cell phone

A file photo of a person using a smart phone in Chicago. Nearly all Americans agree that the rampant spread of misinformation is a problem.

A hand holds a cell phone

A file photo of a person using a smart phone in Chicago. Nearly all Americans agree that the rampant spread of misinformation is a problem.

Get out and touch the grass: ‘Anti-dopamine parenting’ could change your kids’ habits

Kids and screens can be a hard-to-break combination. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

A file photo of a person using a smart phone in Chicago. Nearly all Americans agree that the rampant spread of misinformation is a problem.

   

Research shows that screens – and the hyper-social connections they provide – can trigger dopamine responses in users so frequently it can turn us into actual addicts. And for kids, that’s especially concerning.

That’s why some people are trying “anti-dopamine parenting.”

Reset checks in with two experts on what a digital reset could look like for kids.

GUESTS: Devorah Heitner, author of Screenwise: Helping Kids Thrive (and Survive) in Their Digital World and Growing Up in Public

Dr. Khalid Afzal, assistant professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Chicago Medicine

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