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An abandoned car bobs in standing water under an overpass Thursday, April 18, 2013, in Chicago. Blasts of torrential rain and widespread flooding forced authorities to shut segments of major expressways, and hundreds of flights were scrapped. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

M. Spencer Green

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An abandoned car bobs in standing water under an overpass Thursday, April 18, 2013, in Chicago. Blasts of torrential rain and widespread flooding forced authorities to shut segments of major expressways, and hundreds of flights were scrapped. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

M. Spencer Green

July storms prove too much for Chicago’s Deep Tunnel

The Deep Tunnel’s large sewers can hold 2.3 billion gallons of storm runoff. So why didn't the system reduce floods like it’s supposed to?

An abandoned car bobs in standing water under an overpass Thursday, April 18, 2013, in Chicago. Blasts of torrential rain and widespread flooding forced authorities to shut segments of major expressways, and hundreds of flights were scrapped. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

M. Spencer Green

   

Chicago’s $3.8 billion Deep Tunnel flood-control project was seemingly ready to go before the torrential downpours in early July. But as the rain came down, runoff overflowed onto streets and into residents’ homes in what would become a record-setting storm.

Reset learns more about the city’s Tunnel and Reservoir Plan.

GUEST: Michael Hawthorne, environment and public health reporter at the Chicago Tribune

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