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Youth climate activists scored a major win in Montana. Could Illinois be next?

Students cheer during a protest organized by the U.S. Youth Climate Strike outside of Miami Beach City Hall, as part of a global day of climate action, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Miami Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Lynne Sladky/AP

Youth climate activists scored a major win in Montana. Could Illinois be next?

Students cheer during a protest organized by the U.S. Youth Climate Strike outside of Miami Beach City Hall, as part of a global day of climate action, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Miami Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Lynne Sladky/AP

Youth climate activists scored a major win in Montana. Could Illinois be next?

A Montana judge ruled in favor of young people’s constitutional right to a ‘healthful environment.’

Students cheer during a protest organized by the U.S. Youth Climate Strike outside of Miami Beach City Hall, as part of a global day of climate action, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Miami Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Lynne Sladky/AP

   

Held v. Montana is the first lawsuit of its kind to go to trial, with plaintiffs ranging from age 5 to age 22. It’s also a landmark ruling: climate change must now be considered when approving or renewing future fossil fuel projects in the state.

Reset gets reaction from youth climate activists in Illinois, and hears what actions they want adults to take here. Then we turn to policy experts to learn what kind of related lawsuit could be possible in Illinois.

GUEST: Natasha Bahtia, senior at HInsdale Central High School, co-head Fridays for Future, Chicago

Danica Sun, senior at Illinois Math and Science Academy, co-head Fridays for Future, Chicago

Karen Weigert, director of Loyola University Chicago’s Baumhart Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility

Howard Learner, president, executive director, Environmental Law & Policy Center

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