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Talking Heads concert film ‘Stop Making Sense’ back on the big screen

Musicians Jerry Harrison, left, Tina Weymouth, Chris Frantz and David Byrne of the Talking Heads pose together at a special screening of “Stop Making Sense” to celebrate the 40th anniversary 4k remastered rerelease at Metrograph on Thursday, Sept. 14, 2023, in New York.

(Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

Talking Heads concert film ‘Stop Making Sense’ back on the big screen

Musicians Jerry Harrison, left, Tina Weymouth, Chris Frantz and David Byrne of the Talking Heads pose together at a special screening of “Stop Making Sense” to celebrate the 40th anniversary 4k remastered rerelease at Metrograph on Thursday, Sept. 14, 2023, in New York.

(Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

Talking Heads concert film ‘Stop Making Sense’ back on the big screen

A panel discusses the 1984 cult classic and its restoration in 4K, which is currently in Chicago theaters.

Musicians Jerry Harrison, left, Tina Weymouth, Chris Frantz and David Byrne of the Talking Heads pose together at a special screening of “Stop Making Sense” to celebrate the 40th anniversary 4k remastered rerelease at Metrograph on Thursday, Sept. 14, 2023, in New York.

(Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

   

In 1983 the Talking Heads were on tour promoting their album Speaking in Tongues. It was big and flashy with epic stage pieces and theatrical lighting. Four nights of these concerts were filmed and packaged as Stop Making Sense, released in 1984.

A recent restoration has the film back in theaters.

Reset checks in with three fans on why you might want to go check it out.

GUESTS: Michael Phillips, film critic, Chicago Tribune

Camryn Lewis, programmer, Music Box Theatre

Lisa Labuz, WBEZ midday anchor

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