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Before it transformed into X, Twitter was the place to turn to for live and reliable information about big news events, from wars to natural disasters.

Twitter Company

Before it transformed into X, Twitter was the place to turn to for live and reliable information about big news events, from wars to natural disasters.

Changes at X encourage spread of false claims, especially about Israel-Hamas war

Since Hamas attacked Israel and Israel began to bomb the Gaza Strip over the weekend, people around the world have been turning to social platforms to learn more about the situation. What they’re finding there is a deluge of information, and it’s not easy — even for experts — to distinguish between facts and falsehoods. Reset speaks with a reporter and literacy experts about how to verify information online. GUESTS: Shannon Bond, NPR correspondent covering disinformation and democracy Peter Adams, senior vice president of research and design, News Literacy Project David Rapp, professor of education and social policy and professor of psychology, Northwestern University

Before it transformed into X, Twitter was the place to turn to for live and reliable information about big news events, from wars to natural disasters.

   

Since Hamas attacked Israel and Israel began to bomb the Gaza Strip over the weekend, people around the world have been turning to social platforms to learn more about the situation. What they’re finding there is a deluge of information, and it’s not easy — even for experts — to distinguish between facts and falsehoods.

Reset speaks with a reporter and literacy experts about how to verify information online.

GUESTS: Shannon Bond, NPR correspondent covering disinformation and democracy

Peter Adams, senior vice president of research and design, News Literacy Project

David Rapp, professor of education and social policy and professor of psychology, Northwestern University

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