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Students learning to read

Third-graders Lucas Haviland, left, Brady Hale, center and Hunter Davis read a book together at Highland Elementary School in Columbus, Kan., on Monday, Oct. 17, 2022.

Charlie Riedel/AP

Students learning to read

Third-graders Lucas Haviland, left, Brady Hale, center and Hunter Davis read a book together at Highland Elementary School in Columbus, Kan., on Monday, Oct. 17, 2022.

Charlie Riedel/AP

Illinois Board of Education votes to update reading instruction

The new literacy plan places heavy emphasis on “evidence-based learning.”

Third-graders Lucas Haviland, left, Brady Hale, center and Hunter Davis read a book together at Highland Elementary School in Columbus, Kan., on Monday, Oct. 17, 2022.

Charlie Riedel/AP

   

There’s a growing movement across the country to follow scientific approaches to reading instruction that lean on phonics to help students recognize and decode words. Advocates say the current approach to teaching reading leaves kids behind and has led to many kids not reading at grade level.

Reset learns about the update and what this could mean for teachers.

GUESTS: Mawa Iqbal, WBEZ statehouse reporter

Tinaya York, founder, lead advocate Literacy for Life

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